The Cosmosphere’s Grand Lobby and flight simulator will close at 5 pm on March 1. Please use the entrance to the north of the main entrance. 

X-Plane Gallery with people

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It’s Volta Day! Celebrate Batteries, Energy, and More with Your Students at the Cosmosphere

Who Was Volta?

Italian physicist Alessandro Volta invented the battery in 1799. He was born on February 18, 1745. Join the Cosmosphere Education team on February 16, to help celebrate his electrifying birthday!

Image: Alessandro Volta with his electric pile, or wet battery, in an illustration by Louis Figuier, 1870.

How Can Students Join the Fun (And Meet Science Standards) February 16?

Join Us In-Person:

Classes in grades 3+ are invited to build a replica of the earliest batteries using pennies and zinc washers. (4-PS3-2; 4-PS3-4) (MS-PS2-3) (HS-PS3-3)

Students will see an exclusive video from astronaut Kayla Barron. Plus, whoever produces the most powerful battery will have an opportunity to win an autographed astronaut photo!

See what else is new at the Cosmosphere with a sneak peek of our new Dr. Goddard’s Lab Chemistry Show!

Bring your class for only $50!

  • Guided Tours and Planetarium shows are also available
  • Carey Digital Dome Theater Documentaries available for an additional $6

Unable to attend in-person?

Purchase battery kits (pictured here) for $2.00 a kit, plus shipping. You can also join us for the Livestream at 1:00 p.m. CST.

Download the Lesson Plan here.

Sign Up for Battery Kits here.

Sign Up for Livestream here.

Image: Cosmosphere’s custom battery kit recreates Volta’s first battery using pennies.

Questions? Contact our Education team at schools@cosmo.org. 

Image: Cosmosphere’s completed battery. Battery kit pieces might vary.

If You’re Ever in Italy

The beautiful Tempio Voltiano museum honors the work of Alessandro Volta. Located in the lakeside town of Como, Italy, where Volta was born and died, their collection includes a first version of the electric battery (pictured here).

Image: The Tempio Voltiano museum in Como, Italy, honoring the work of Alessandro Volta. Image credit: Italy Magazine

Image: Volta’s first battery used an arrangement of copper discs known as the Voltaic Pile.